COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

Last updated: July 13, 2020

CPCA Response

CPCA is working closely with community health centers and regional/state/federal partners to understand and address health center needs and challenges in responding to the COVID-19.

CPCA Priorities

Federal, State, and Local Response

All levels of government are taking considerable action to combat the novel coronavirus.  Here is a timeline of key federal actions:

  • Late January - The U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Azar declared COVID-19 a public health emergency, shortly after the World Health Organization issued similar declaration.
  • March 6, 2020 - President Trump signed into law HR 6074 - Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act.  HR 6074 included $8.3 billion in funding to help local and state government with preparedness, mitigation, and response efforts. HR 6074 also included $100 million dedicated to health centers to combat COVID-19 and $500 million to expand the availability of telehealth services to Medicare patients.
  • March 13, 2020 - President declared a national emergency, unlocking CMS authority to waive Medicare and Medicaid requirements.
  • March 14, 2020 - The House passed a second COVID-19 related bill, HR 6201 - the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. The bill, once passed by the Senate and signed into law, will address food insecurity problems, create emergency paid sick leave for employees recovering from COVID-19 or caring for ill relatives, provide additional funds to states to pay for unemployment benefits related to COVID-19, and mandate testing with no cost to the consumer whether they are commercially insured, covered by Medicare, or covered by Medi-Cal, allows states to modify state Medicaid plans to include COVID-19 testing for uninsured and temporarily increases the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) for the matching funds states receives to support certain medical and social service programs, including Medi-Cal.  At time of writing, this bill is awaiting senate action.
  • March 27, 2020 – President Trump signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act into law. In addition to key funding provisions within the Act, there are impacts to human resources, workforce, and care delivery. To see NACHC’s summary of the CAREs Act, please click here.

President Trump and the White House Coronavirus Task Force continue to revise guidelines. Revised federal guidelines can be found by clicking here
Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, California has taken an active approach to ensure public safety. Here is a timeline of key state actions:

  • March 4, 2020 - Governor Newsom declared a state of emergency in California, escalating state responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Shortly after, Gov. Newsom began issuing executive orders (EO) to support the health and wellbeing of all Californians. To see a full list of executive orders click here.
  • March 16, 2020 - The state legislature, before announcing a recess through April 13, 2020, waived constitutional rules to allow the legislature to pass emergency legislation and budget appropriations. SB 89 amends the budget act of 2019-20 to appropriate $500 million from the General Fund to be used for any purpose related to the Governor’s March 4, 2020 declaration of emergency and authorizes up to $1 billion in  future COVID-19 expenditures. SB 117 specifically provides for the funding of schools and waiving of education-related timelines.
HRSA is working quickly to develop a spending plan for the $100 million allotted by Congress for health centers to combat the COVID-19. More information is available here. Additionally, HRSA has created a COVID-19 webpage with useful resources for health centers, including guidance on requesting a change in scope of project to add a temporary site(s) in response to emergency events, FTCA coverage when responding to emergency events, and health center program FAQs

Health Center COVID-19 Information Collection
Beginning April 6th, HRSA will open the health center COVID-19 survey ONCE a week on Friday afternoons. HRSA is requiring health centers fill out this survey to help track the number of patients that have undergone testing at each health center along with other critical information. Please visit the Information Collection section of the HRSA FAQs for details.

Each health center will receive an electronic, easy to use survey (reducing the need for telephonic, email, or other methods of gathering critical COVID-19 related information) once a week via email from BPHCanswers@hrsa.gov.

HRSA will use the information collected to assess health centers' needs throughout the COVID-19 response, to share critical information related to testing, cases, and impacts at health centers, and to better understand training and technical assistance, funding, and other resource needs.

Health Center Preparedness & Response

To ensure that Emergency Operations Plans are in place, discussing resource needs for the health center, and continuing to meet monthly per HRSA requirements.  Click here for more detailed information on each area.

Posted: 3/25/2020

Both the CDC and California Department of Public Health (CDPH) have created webpages with resources and guidance. The CPCA website contains links to relevant CDC and CDPH resources as well as FQHC specific emergency preparedness response and recovery resources. Additional resources can be found on the Emergency Management Advisory Coalition (EMAC) website.
 
Staying informed about the rapidly changing COVID-19 situation is paramount; visit the CDC website and CDPH website for the latest information. Additionally, it is important to review and update your health center’s emergency operations plan (EOP), paying special attention to your pandemic influenza plan and patient surge capacity. Your EOP is essential to minimizing disruption to patient care, ensuring business continuity, and improving recovery efforts. CPCA has developed a number of resources, including templates and trainings, to assist you in developing an EOP. Click here to access resources. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response has developed a COVID-19 Healthcare Planning Checklist that identifies specific activities you can do now to respond to and be resilient in the face of COVID-19.
The contact information for HCCs throughout the state can be found here . Health centers are highly encouraged to collaborate with their local HHC to prepare for and respond to disasters and emergencies. 
 

With resources at critically low levels across all regions of the state, the nation, and worldwide, the best way to get supplies in California is to request them through the Medical and Health Operational Area Coordinator (MHOAC) Program.

Understanding that access to PPE continues to be a challenge and while we continue to advocate for more supplies, CPCA recommends that health centers continue submitting requests through the Medical and Health Operational Area Coordinator (MHOAC) Program. A list of county MHOAC contacts is here. It is important to continue submitting requests through this system to ensure health center resource needs are relayed at the State and federal level. Please send any challenges experienced to Amanda Willard at awillard@cpca.org.

CDC PPE Burn Rate Calculator: This is a useful tool to help better understand how much PPE your health center is using and to help assess how much PPE to request.

You must report COVID-positive patients to your local public health officer. Some local public health officers have a form they want the hospital to complete, while others take information over the phone and complete the paperwork themselves. Check with your local public health department to learn their process. You do not need to report suspected cases or persons under investigation (PUIs), unless your local public health officer has directed you to do so. However, if you have an unusual PUI case and believe it should be brought to the attention of your local public health officer, then do so.

NACHC has brought together resources for health centers to better understand how the Strategic National Stockpile works and how understanding the supply chain to request resources from the federal government is essential. Additionally, NACHC sent a letter to the FEMA Administrator informing him of the role health centers are playing in their local responses, along with developed a template for PCAs to share with their own state emergency managers and Governor emphasizing these points. Finally, during this time staying vigilant and aware of potential fraud from vendors selling emergency related supplies and resource is an essential part of daily operations.

Care Delivery

The CDC has released recommendations and guidance on persons under investigation; infection control, including personal protective equipment guidance; home care and isolation; and case investigation. You may access those resources here.
 
Local, state and federal governments are working together to address the nationwide mass shortage of PPE equipment. If a health center's regular distributors are unable to fulfill orders for critical medical supplies such as personal protective equipment, the first step is to contact your local and/or state public health department for immediate assistance. If the county/state is unable to provide supplies, please inform Amanda Willard (awillard@cpca.org) of encounter challenges with getting your PPE requests filled by your local or state health department. CPCA is pushing for the state and federal governments to prioritize health centers for PPE supplies.  One way to help is for us to have specific examples of when a health center reached out to their county/local health department to request a PPE restock and were either denied or were met with other challenges (communication issues, lengthy process, etc.). Please inform Amanda Willard (awillard@cpca.org

Health centers should also contact their local healthcare coalition (HCCs) for emergency supplies, including N95 masks. HCCs collaborate with healthcare and response organizations in a defined geographic location to prepare for and respond to disasters and emergencies. If you are not already connected to your HCC, now is the time to engage. The contact information for HCCs throughout the state can be found here
Direct Relief is experiencing the same PPE shortages and is being very strategic about how they provide support.  Please send Amanda Willard (awillard@cpca.org) any information regarding status of known COVID-19 cases or persons under investigation as relief organizations are more inclined to provide support in those situations as they move from preparedness/containment to mitigation.

No. Per AFL 20-30, Primary Care Clinics do not need to submit individual program flexibility requests for the regulations specified in the AFL. The waiver includes permission for drive-thru COVID-19 screening/testing. This waiver is valid until March 1, 2021, and may be extended based on any updated Executive Order.

Yes. Per AFL 20-30, an intermittent clinic operated be a PCC may extend operating hours beyond 40 hours per week during the current declared state of emergency. This waiver is valid until March 1, 2021, and may be extended based on any updated Executive Orders.

Yes. Per AFL 20-30, PCCs with pending applications for clinic licensure may begin providing care prior to approval by CDPH during the current declared state of emergency.

Please Note: Effective dates for Medi-Cal certification may not currently align with licensing flexibility given by CDPH. CPCA staff continue work to clarify Medi-Cal enrollment/billing requirements set by DHCS for new clinic sites during the state of emergency. This waiver is valid until March 1, 2021, and may be extended based on any updated Executive Orders.

A PCC shall not be subject to the 60-day prior notice requirement when changing a service, remodeling, modifying, or adding an additional physical plant during the current declared state of emergency. This waiver is valid until March 1, 2021, and may be extended based on any updated Executive Orders.

We are encouraging our health centers to honor this direction too and are already hearing from health centers that they are reducing or closing their dental service. Though this will be an extreme financial hardship, we understand this is in the absolute necessity to guarantee patient safety, safety for dentists, hygienists, and staff.

NACHC is aware of this and is working on making sure there are federal resources to support health center dental programs.  

Telemedicine

Yes, FQHC, RHCs, and IHS-MOAs can provide and bill for telephonic visits. Telephonic visits that meet the DHCS documentation criteria are eligible for PPS reimbursement and should be billed as follows: 

For purposes of the temporary flexibilities under this policy, FQHCs and RHCs would continue to bill with a Revenue Code (0521) in conjunction with a HCPCS code (T1015/T1015 SE), but would also include the appropriate corresponding CPT codes (i.e., 99201-99205 for “new” patients, and 99211-99215 for “established” patients) on the “informational” line relative to the complexity of the virtual/telephonic communication.  

Similarly, for purposes of the temporary flexibilities under this policy, Tribal 638 Clinics would continue to bill with a Revenue Code (0520) in conjunction with a HCPCS code (T1015), but would also include the appropriate corresponding CPT codes (i.e., 9920199205 for “new” patients, and 99211-99215 for “established patients”) on the “informational” line relative to the complexity of the virtual/telephonic communication.

Telephonic visits that do not meet the documentation criteria can be billed FFS using HCPCS code G0071.  Please see the DHCS COVID-19 Guidance for Telehealth and Telephonic Communications for more information.
Yes, DHCS has temporarily waived the four walls requirement, which allows telehealth and telephonic services to be provided regardless of where the patient or provider is located.
While DHCS is still working with DHCS on additional 1135 waiver requests that include flexibility with telehealth/telephone, DHCS has confirmed that FQHCs, RHCs, and IHS-MOAs can proceed with the guidance DHCS has issued absent CMS formal approval.
Telephonic visits that meet documentation criteria are PPS eligible.  Telephonic visits that do not meet the documentation criteria are reimbursed FFS using HCPCS code G0071. Please see the DHCS COVID-19 Guidance for Telehealth and Telephonic Communications for more information.
Yes, FQHCs, RHCs, and IHS-MOAs can provide and bill for synchronous and asynchronous telehealth visits that meet all documentation and reimbursement requirements.  FQHCs and RHCs will receive PPS reimbursement for telehealth visits. FQHCs and RHCs would bill using the same process as other billable visits where the patient is in person. These visits would be billed using the appropriate all-inclusive billing code sets and related claims submission requirements.  Please see the Medi-Cal Provider Manual: FQHC/RHC Section and Medi-Cal Provider Manual: FQHC/RHC Billing Codes Section for detailed billing guidance.
AB 1494 does not apply to straight Medicare patients. Currently, FQHCs and RHCs can serve as the originating site (regardless of their geographic location) and bill Medicare for the telehealth originating site facility fee on a RHC or FQHC claim under revenue code 0780 and HCPCS code Q3014.  FQHCs can also bill Medicare for virtual check-ins using HCPCS code G0071 for FFS reimbursement.
  
Additionally, the CARE Act authorized FQHCs to serve as distant site providers but has not released guidance on how to bill for these services.  Medicare will reimburse for the telehealth services on a FFS basis; the exact amount is to be determined. We are closely monitoring implementation of the CARE Act and will provide an update on as soon that information becomes available.
Yes, CPCA has developed trainings and resources on telehealth and telephonic services.  Please visit the CPCA COVID-19 webpage to access past training recordings and slide decks as well as register for upcoming trainings. 

Workforce

The following Crowdsourced document compiles Crowdsourced HR resources, policies and procedures from 650+ HR professionals. Though it is not specific to health centers, there's a pile of great resources that may serve as a starting point and help health centers think through some of the HR policies and procedures that need to be updated/created in response to COVID-19.

California’s state treasurer office has developed a running list of federal, state, local, and private funding opportunities. A combination of loans and grants are available to support organizations during this crisis- find the full list hereIn addition, NACHC created the “Grants, Loans, and Other Cashflow Options for Health Centers” resources – full guide and summary . California also recently launched a Small Business Disaster Relief Loan Guarantee Program for small businesses with up to 750 employees.

The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) at the U.S. Small Business Administration can be used for payroll support, insurance premiums, and mortgage, rent and utility payments. While the initial $349 billion from the CARES Act was utilized within the first two weeks of the program, President Trump signed legislation on April 24, 2020 providing an additional $310 billion for this program. Community health centers eligible through the employee-based (500 employees or less) or revenue-based size standards (max net worth of $15M and average net income of $5M) can submit an application through SBA lenders. Additional information can be found on the PPP FAQs. CPCA also created a webcast alongside Melissa Schoen and MaryKate Scott to share how community health centers can calculate the Paycheck Protection Program loan, use the loan fund, qualify for loan forgiveness, and submit an application. BKD also released a set of FAQs based on the SBA’s second round of Paycheck Protection Program clarifications.

UPDATE: The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released on April 30, 2020 Notice 2020-32, which “clarifies that no deduction is allowed under the Internal Revenue Code (Code) for an expense that is otherwise deductible if the payment of the expense results in forgiveness of a covered loan pursuant to section 1106(b) of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act).” It is our understanding that this means no deductions will be allowed for expenses that were forgiven under the PPP loan.

Yes.  Non-Congregate Sheltering for California Healthcare Workers Program provides hotel rooms to frontline healthcare workers who are exposed to or test positive for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Eligible staff will be provided rooms at pre-identified hotels at no charge or at a discounted rate. A health center must certify to the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) that your health center treats confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients. CDPH provides a template letter health centers may edit and submit to California’s Governor’s Office of Emergency Services. The deadline to submit a letter on an official letterhead to HealthcareNCS@caloes.ca.gov is April 30, 2020.

CPCA recently developed an H-1B Visa FAQ that outlines commonly asked questions and aims to strengthen your understanding of H-1B employer requirements during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to reviewing the FAQ, you are encouraged to consult with your legal counsel to ensure H-1B visa compliance with federal regulations.

Yes. Governor Newsom allocated $100 million in funding to offer subsidized child care services to essential infrastructure workers (healthcare workers receive priority) now through June 30. Health center staff who meet the eligibility requirements issued by the state should connect with their respective Resource and Referral Agency . Each agency is available to provide guidance and answer questions related to emergency child care services, program eligibility, enrollment, and resources available.
California announced the launch of the MyChildCarePlan (MCCP) website that consolidates child care services information by county. The state is requiring Referral Agencies (R&Rs) and Local Planning Councils (LPCs) to update the website each week to reflect programs and their availability.  The state is also requiring both R&Rs and LPCs to collaborate in close coordination and help match essential worker families with programs that have open vacancies, ideally in real time or in no less than 24 hours.
Governor signed Executive Order N-39-20, which allowed for the possibility of quickly expanding the health care workforce by implementing such strategies as relaxed supervision caps, creating expedited pathways for licensure reinstatement, among other workforce expansion strategies. The Governor designated the Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) to assume implementation authority. To date, DCA has issued three waivers on continuing education, reinstatement of licensure, and nursing student clinical hours. Click here to read more.
The Families First Coronavirus Response Act was passed by the Senate and signed by President Trump on March 18, 2020.  Key priorities applicable to health centers include, expanded emergency medical and family leave, emergency paid sick leave, and tax credits for employers. The new law takes effect on April 1, applies to employers fewer than 500 employees, and expires on December 31, 2020. Tax credits are available to use against the employer’s quarterly payroll taxes. With the Department of Labor’s (DOL) release of additional clarifications related to paid leave requirements under the new FFCRA, CPCA developed a FFCRA guide and FAQ that includes questions commonly asked by community health centers. Additional information on this topic can also be found on the DOL COVID-19 and the American Workplace webpage.

The EDD encourages all organizations experiencing workforce hardship to reach out and assess if they can participate in the EDD Unemployment Insurance Work Sharing Program.  This program helps employers and employees avoid some of the burdens that accompany a layoff situation. Participating organizations retain their workers by reducing their hours and wages no more than 60 percent and partially offset the wage loss with UI benefits. This helps organizations avoid the cost of recruiting, hiring, and training new workers and helps workers keep their jobs and receive some financial support with UI benefits. Organizations and their workers can also be prepared to quickly adjust when business improves. For additional information on the Work Sharing Program, contact the EDD Special Claims Office at 916-464-3343.

Individuals who are unable to work due to having or being exposed to COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim with the California Employee Development Department. Additionally, Californians who are unable to work because they are caring for an ill or quarantined family member with COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim. Eligibility for PFL expanded starting April 2 due to the passage of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Under current criteria, to be eligible for PFL benefits, you must submit certain medical documentation regarding the family member in your care who is either ill or quarantined due to COVID-19. This requirement can be met by a medical certification for that person from a treating physician or a practitioner that includes a diagnosis and ICD-10 code, or if no diagnosis has been obtained, a statement of symptoms; the start date of the condition; its probable duration; and the treating physician’s or practitioner’s license number or facility information. This requirement can also be met by a written order from a state or local health officer that is specific to your family member’s situation. For fastest processing of your claim, submit your claim online   and have the supporting medical documentation submitted online immediately after. 

If your employer reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you are encouraged to file an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim. UI provides partial wage replacement benefit payments to workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced, through no fault of their own. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to COVID-19 and expected to return to work with their employer within a few weeks are not required to actively seek work each week. However, they must remain able, available, and ready to work during their unemployment for each week of benefits claimed and meet all other eligibility criteria.

Individuals who are unable to work due to having or being exposed to COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim with the California Employee Development Department. Additionally, Californians who are unable to work because they are caring for an ill or quarantined family member with COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim. Eligibility for PFL expanded starting April 2 due to the passage of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Under current criteria, to be eligible for PFL benefits, you must submit certain medical documentation regarding the family member in your care who is either ill or quarantined due to COVID-19. This requirement can be met by a medical certification for that person from a treating physician or a practitioner that includes a diagnosis and ICD-10 code, or if no diagnosis has been obtained, a statement of symptoms; the start date of the condition; its probable duration; and the treating physician’s or practitioner’s license number or facility information. This requirement can also be met by a written order from a state or local health officer that is specific to your family member’s situation. For fastest processing of your claim, submit your claim online   and have the supporting medical documentation submitted online immediately after. 

On March 22, DHCS released additional clarification on the definition of “essential workforce” to help employers identify staff deemed as necessary in the maintenance and continuity of the Healthcare and Public Health Sector. The list of workforce members not subject to California’s Public Health directives to stay at home include health care providers, caregivers, and workers in Rural Health Clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers. A more extensive list can be viewed through the state’s COVID-19 information center. In addition, the California Department of Public Health Stated in a COVID-19 public health guidance that self-isolation does not apply to hospital and healthcare workers over the age of 65. While these definitions exist, we recognize that there are many unique individual circumstances and encourage health centers to also care for their staff as they care for their patients.

Health centers experiencing a hardship as a result of COVID-19 may request up to a 60-day extension of time from the California Employment Development Department (EDD) to file their state payroll reports and/or deposit state payroll taxes without penalty or interest. A written request for extension must be received within 60 days from the original delinquent date of the payment or return. For questions, health centers may call the EDD Taxpayer Assistance Center (1-888-745-3886). Click here for more information.

Please consult with your local health department and review the CDC’s Interim U.S. Guidance for Risk Assessment and Public Health Management of Healthcare Personnel with Potential Exposure in a Healthcare Setting to Patients with Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). Additionally, please visit Cal/OSHA Guidance on Coronavirus to learn more about workplace requirements
 

Several federal, state and local government agencies have provided resources to help employers and employees navigate workplace issues related to COVID-19. CPCA encourages health centers review the frequently updated information posted on the sites below.

FEDERAL
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Interim Guidance For Businesses and Employers

 

U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

 

 

U.S. Department of Labor Wage & Hour Division
 
FFCRA DOL FAQ
COVID-19 & Fair Labor Standards Act FAQ

 

 

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
 COVID-19 & Antidiscrimination FAQs

 

STATE
CA Employment Development Department (EDD)
 
Guidance Related To Reduced Hours, School Closures, Potential Site Closures, And Unemployment Insurance Claims
FAQ On Disability Or Paid Family Leave Benefits, Unemployment Insurance, Employer Information 

CA Labor & Workforce Development Agency
Guidance for Workers and Employers

CA Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE)
FAQs On Laws Enforced By The California Labor Commissioner's Office

CA Governor’s Office of Business & Economic Development
Coronavirus-2019

Access and Coverage

In situations where the applicant or beneficiary is unable to provide the necessary verification, counties may accept a signed and dated affidavit, under penalty of perjury, to verify California residency, income, and property from applicants who are unable to provide necessary verification due to the public health crisis or disaster. Verification of citizenship or immigration status is still required. 
 
This guidance was reaffirmed by DHCS to counties in March 2020 via (MEDIL 20-06) citing instructions in ACWDL 19-01 to accept self-attestation, electronic verification, and ex parte review to attempt to confirm eligibility without requesting additional documentation from the applicant. 
Yes and yes. Per DHCS guidance (ACWDL 19-17), the Medi-Cal program must accept applications, renewals, appointments of Medi-Cal authorized representatives (ARs), and reported changes in information over the telephone. Per the same guidance, counties must accept handwritten signatures transmitted via any other electronic transmission (i.e. electronic-signatures). 
USCIS announced on Friday that COVID-19 testing, treatment, and preventative care will not be considered a factor in a public charge determination and is encouraging everyone to seek care when needed.

Yes, eligible patients can apply for Medi-Cal benefits and will have benefits be retroactive to the signup date; or apply for coverage through Covered California. Covered California extended the Special Open Enrollment period until June 30, 2020. Additionally, as of March 20th, California put a 90-day hold on all Medi-Cal renewal reviews, ensuring those already enrolled can continue their coverage.

Family PACT providers may enroll and recertify clients through telehealth or other virtual/telephonic communication modalities, throughout the course of the COVID-19 emergency. Click the link to read the full guidance for Family PACT providers, including instructions for telephonic client enrollment and re-certification.

The Department of Health Care Services created a new Presumptive Eligibility program (PE COVID-19) that will allow individuals to seek the necessary diagnostic testing, related services including clinic or emergency room visit, at no cost to the individual.

The aid code will be available to individuals with no insurance or those with private insurance that does not cover diagnostic testing and all testing-related services associated with COVID-19. The aid code will be available to California residents, without regard to immigration status, income, or resources. A patient can access free services through PE COVID-19 by visiting a PE Qualified Provider, who will submit an application and determine eligibility within 24 hours. The PE COVID-19 enrollment period begins on the date of application and ends on the last day of the following month in which the individual was determined eligible for PE.

The PE COVID-19 Program will be implemented effective April 25, 2020. DHCS is implementing an interim process so providers can render the COVID-19 diagnostic testing and testing-related services at the time of the individual’s visit to the office, hospital or clinic. During the interim process, DHCS will process the email referrals within 24 hours so providers can be paid for the services rendered for COVID-19 diagnostic testing and testing-related services to individuals.